Goa

Life in Goa: Sao Jacinto & An Abandoned Lighthouse

 

A few weeks back, I saw a post on Instagram about an abandoned lighthouse at Sao Jacinto Island Goa. Filled with curiosity and a lust to explore, I headed out in search of this lighthouse. Here is the photo story about how I found that abandoned lighthouse.

ABOUT SAO JACINTO ISLAND

Sao Jacinto Island or San Jacinto Island is a quiet and peaceful island lying in the Mormugao bay. A church dedicated to St. Hyacinth overlooks the waters of the river towards the east. Every year on the last Sunday of September, church’s annual feast takes place.

 

There are a couple of old houses scattered around the island. Sao Jacinto Island comprises around 200 houses and 70 families are presently residing on the Island. The total population, as of 2014, was around seven hundred people.

Interesting thing I got to know about this island was that the entire community has unanimously agreed on one principle: If you happen to be a non-Goan or even Goan not hailing from St Jacinto Island, you will not be allowed to buy property on the island.

The Abandoned Lighthouse

While doing the research before visiting the lighthouse, I found some articles mentioning how it’s fiercely protected by the locals.

The whole area around the lighthouse is surrounded by bushes and trees, which makes it a bit difficult to access. But somehow I managed to find a marble plaque with some inscriptions on it [Pic below]

This is what it translates to [Thanks, Google Translate]:

Built in 10-2-1900

Governer  Councillor Joaquim Machado

Captain of the ports

The last line roughly to “Rock Scallop”, which I am not sure what it means in this context. Between 1897 to 1900, Joaquim José Machado aka Major Machado was the 110th Governor of Portuguese India.

Interesting, isn’t it?

THE ROUTE

Here are few more pictures of the place:

So, if you are ever in this part of Goa, make sure to go on a quick trek around the island, enjoy the beautiful sunset and have a sip or two of beer at the restaurant by the river and interact with the locals.

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