Goa

Exploring Remains of Ancient Gopakapattana Port in Goa

Gopakapattana or Gopakpatna, was a prosperous ancient port city in the west coastal Indian state of Goa, that served as capital under the reign of different Hindu dynasties extending from 100 BC to 1469 AD which ruled ancient Goa. Among historical harbours of India, the ports of Goa had played a significant role in the maritime trade. The ports of Goa such as Chandor, Gopakapattana, and Old Goa were located on riverbanks and had trade contacts with the ports of India as well other parts of the world. As per historical records, Gopakapattana was used as a port since 750 AD, but gained even more prominence when the area was converted into a capital city in the middle of 11th century. Various dynasties maintained trade ties with East asian and west african countries through this port. Situated on the banks of river Zuari, Gopakapattana was the main entry point for Arab traders. When Goa’s capital was again moved to Ela [Old Goa] in late 15th Century, commercial port activity also moved from Gopakapattana to Old Goa. Moreover, sedimentation and recurrent wars also contributed to the decline of this port.

In this video, I am exploring a lesser known beach and a tiny part of Goa’s ancient maritime history: ruins of 11th century Goapakapattana Port situated on the banks of Zuari River in Agassaim.

Today, all that remains is a narrow strip of old laterite stones on the Agassaim Beach which gets exposed during low tides.

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